Originally posted on https://www.redfin.com/blog/2017/11/home-staging-secrets-by-city.html Written by Bailey Chauner on November 8, 2017 What is the best way to stage your home? Redfin asked 37 experts all over the U.S to share their secrets. When staging your house, how do you appeal to every person who will walk through your doors? Sure, you adore your black marble countertop and blue walls, but what will the buyer’s think? While it’s impossible to cater to everyone’s different preferences, there are some overarching similarities to appeal to many buyers – simply based on your location. Redfin sought out home staging experts to share with you their secrets to appeal to buyers in 37 cities across the United States! Los Angeles, California: Modern decor and art “The most important trend in Los Angeles for the last few years has been a move away from traditional furnishings, to a transitional look which incorporates modern element.  Modern decor, especially modern art, now works with every style.” – Meridith Baer San Francisco, California: Natural interior and modern art “Buyers in the San Francisco Bay Area love a classically modern home with eclectic touches. They are knowledgeable about the latest trends and appreciate quality furnishings and high-end design. Natural interior elements, original art and modern decor are incorporated into each home we stage. This offers the “WOW” factor that is highly appealing to buyers and allows them to mentally unpack while touring the home.”  – Halcyon Home Staging + Design Fresno, California: Clearly designated spaces with a touch of elegance “Potential homebuyers in the Fresno, Clovis area are impressed by a modern, yet comfortable-looking home. They appreciate an up-to-date appearance with touches of elegance and clear designated spaces such as a home office, or a cozy patio area outside. We like to stage these areas to show a home’s maximum usability. Staging spaces for work and play in a home definitely attract buyers.” – Selling by Design-Staging Denver, Colorado: Stylized bar carts “One small touch that gets rave reviews when staging homes in Boulder Colorado: a perfectly styled bar cart either in the dining or living room! It sets the tone for entertaining with ease. It has a fun, upscale feel and people can imagine having friends over.” – A Change of Space Washington D.C: Oversized artwork is a must “In Washington D.C., monuments and museums are a part of everyone’s daily ‘visual vernacular’ living in our nation’s capital. Eyes here become accustomed to oversized art, despite the small size of most homes. With that concept in mind, we find using oversized art is one of the keys to setting the tone for the luxury staging that our clients require in a market where the average priced home starts...

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Originally posted on http://mystagingstudio.com/aint-nothin-like-the-real-thing-baby-virtual-staging/ There have been a lot of questions posted recently in the Facebook Staging groups about virtual staging. Many stagers have concerns that the photo-shopped fake will hurt their very real business. To quote Marvin Gaye, “So glad we got the real thing, Baby!” Wish we could show you the virtually staged images of this home, but pretty sure that would break about 39 copyright laws. What we can do is tell you the story. With budgets tight, the investor opted for ‘Virtual Staging’ instead of the admittedly more expensive true staging. 3 months and over $100,000 in price reductions later (insert poop emoji here!), the builder decided it was time to bring in the Staging Design Professionals™. Some virtual staging can be quite realistic and look beautiful. It can be useful in getting prospective buyers to come and view the property. Several problems here, though. First, I can’t say that I have personally seen any of that realistic and beautiful computer-generated work…and I have seen plenty of VS images. Second, any buyer is still going to be sorely disappointed when they go to see the home in person. Big. Letdown. They can put an image on an easel to give an idea of how the room could look, but how much more effective it is to experience first-hand how the space would function. The purpose of staging is not just to make a space beautiful, but also to show how it can function. In this case, the virtual missed the boat in several ways. This outdoor area looked pretty bleak, and I have to admit that the virtually staged image was a big improvement. However, the patio seating area that they showed here would seem absurd to anyone who physically went to the home, as this is actually the driveway, and all of that pretty furniture would be plowed over when you tried to park in the garage. This is the correct outdoor area to be staged. There were a number of issues in this home that vacant staging was able to resolve, where VS couldn’t touch them. The awkward placement of this toilet is all you have to think about when vacant. Let’s give them something else to talk about! Now attention is focused on that gorgeous tile work. Without furniture defining the space, it was difficult to imagine where you would put a dining table. Staging defined the area and created a natural flow. The kitchen had a confusing blank spot. Staging made its purpose clear. Aside from the fact that the furniture in the loft picture was out of scale and couldn’t possibly fit...

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Real Estate Staging Prices


Posted By on Nov 8, 2017

Brought to you by the Real Estate Staging Association, www.RealEstateStaging.com. [Editor’s Note: The nation-wide Real Estate Staging Association (RESA) publishes several documents that they make available  on their website. (Many of these publications are free of charge.) In the blog below, we have posted an excerpt from the above-named publication. At the end of the exceprt, we have noted our price as a point of comparison for you. We think you’ll be pleased with how Su Casa Staging–your local real estate staging expert–stacks up against the national statistics. ] Walk and Talk Consultations RESA Members were asked: Do you provide Walk and Talk Consultations? 88.73% Yes, 11.27% No. How often does the agent pay for the Walk and Talk Consultation? 89% of the time. A Walk and Talk consultation is a verbal consultation in which the stager gives advice to the homeowner and/or listing agent (they take notes) to get the home into market-ready condition. It may include cosmetic fixes, furniture placement, and actual staging advice. The homeowner or agent may then choose to do the work themselves, do some of the work themselves and hire the stager to do a portion of the work, or hire the stager to do everything. Real Estate stagers were asked what their fee is for a one- to two-hour Walk and Talk Consultation.                                                     Walk and Talk Consultations                   Square Feet                Investment Ranges 1,000 Sq. Ft. or less $200.00 – $500.00 1,001 – 2,000 Sq. Ft. $200.00 – $500.00 2,001 – 2,500 Sq. Ft. $200.00 – $525.00 2,501 – 3,000 Sq. Ft. $250.00 – $525.00 3,001 – 3,500 Sq. Ft. $250.00 – $750.00 3,501 – 4,500 Sq. Ft. $300.00 – $750.00 4,501 – 5,500 Sq. Ft. $300.00 – $800.00 **Su Casa Staging offers Walk and Talk Staging Consultations for $95.00 per hour, regardless of the size of the home. Most of our consultations are one-hour long. If you’d like a staging consultation, please contact our Occupied Staging Consultant Julie Lopez at 505.480.5956....

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Re-posted from http://realtormag.realtor.org/home-and-design/feature/article/2017/04/staging-for-cozy-minimalist-look Real estate agents often have to work with either barren rooms or sloppy, overstuffed spaces. But what’s truly attracting the most buyers right now is a deft balance of tidy austerity and a comfortable, lived-in feel. April 2017 by Barbara Ballinger While decluttering a listing before putting it on the market will help sellers keep their homes cleaner and get a head start on packing, this practice also helps the product that’s for sale shine through more clearly. “Staging isn’t about decorating, but putting a room and its architecture in the best light,” says Chicago-area designer and stager Paula Winter. But stagers also caution against stripping too much away, which can make a space feel stark and uninviting. The happy medium is instead a modern, minimalist look that permits buyers to imagine how their furnishings may fit in spatially while exuding warmth from some carefully added accessories. Staging, once mostly for vacant homes or high-priced listings, is now more widely used. Meridith Baer, who stages more than 140 properties a month through her eponymous California firm, says the practice can help increase the sales price and decrease the listing time for homes. The Real Estate Staging Association pegs the average time on the market for homes sold after staging at 21 days, an estimated 90 percent less time than unstaged properties. Bear in mind that different generations have slightly different design tastes and tolerance for clutter or spareness, as do buyers in different geographic markets and price points. “Many in the greater Los Angeles area have been asking for a more minimal look, but in Orange County and Northern California, high-end properties still reflect a rich layering that shows a well-lived, well-traveled life,” Baer says. Here are five recommendations to strike the right balance. 1. Set the stage. It’s called staging for a reason. The idea is to set the mood in the same way that a theatrical backdrop does. Think of how to use furnishings and accessories to tell a story about how a buyer may live there. You want the listing to look modern and gender-neutral to show a home’s bones, not to remind buyers of an antiseptic hospital or laboratory, says Winter. Certified stager Susan Batka of Aerie Interiors in suburban Atlanta suggests adding a few textured pillows, a rug, and maybe a large piece of modern, colorful artwork to give the space the necessary warmth so it looks alive but isn’t overwhelming or too personalized. 2. Declutter. This is still the number one mantra for stagers. “The key to the desired Zen feel is to pick interesting but fewer decorative items and keep upholstered pieces clean and lean,”...

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Re-posted from http://homestagingnewswire.com/four-excuses-sellers-make-and-how-to-handle-them/ July 7, 2017 by Christine Rae 1. I can’t afford to stage. A: In today’s market, you can’t afford not to stage! Every seller we talk to wants to get the most for the property when selling; not capitalizing on the opportunity to maximize your equity return is shortsighted. Buyers today want move-in ready and are willing to pay for it. They don’t want a list of deferred maintenance items without compromising what they are willing to pay. Before you say no to staging consider the cost of NOT staging. Additional mortgage payments, utilities, property taxes, and household expenses while your house sits waiting for a buyer who can’t see past your life. According to research by the National Association of Realtors® the longer a property sits, the lower the sale price will be. If you don’t have the money you need to get the house ready for sale, turn to another source. Perhaps borrow it from a friend, family member, or neighbor. Secure a home equity loan, use a credit card, have a garage sale, or sell something on eBay. PayPal offers a wonderful Bill Me Later service, which offers zero interest over six months. The world is full of money—you just have to find some. It is in your best interest to do so, and you can repay your debt when your house sells for more money. 2. Staging is JUST decluttering and cleaning. I can do that myself. A: This is one of the biggest myths about staging. Pre-packing personal belongings and cleaning are only part of the recipe for successful selling. Fully preparing property for sale involves commitment to three vital steps. The first step identifies areas throughout the property that might adversely affect offers and produces suggestions to maximize equity. Step two is the fulfillment of those recommendations, and step three is the truly amazing component we call showcasing. This step ensures fabulous photos, unforgettable open houses, and memorable first impressions. Many people think of this as decorating, but it isn’t. There is nothing personal about showcasing; it involves research of the targeted buyer demographic and a scientific approach to furniture placement and accessory arrangement, using a subtle color strategy. You might think it isn’t necessary, or you can do it alone; the question to ask is why would you potentially risk thousands of dollars in equity by not working with a professional? 3. I get complements all the time about how great my house looks. Why do I need to stage? A: Again, this is the myth that staging is about decorating; decorating is a personal expression of how we live. The...

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