Originally posted on http://styledstagedsold.blogs.realtor.org/2016/03/21/designing-for-an-open-floor-plan/ Walls are vanishing from newer homes and the open-plan layouts are showing off multi-purpose areas, such as kitchens and dining rooms and living rooms that seamlessly flow into one another. But how do you decorate one large space – to make it comfortable and beautiful for eating, entertaining, relaxing and more? “The key is continuity,” says Kim Kiner, Vice President of Textile & Material Design and The Alustra® Collection for Hunter Douglas. Here are some ways: Color To keep an open-plan interior open, the No. 1 element for achieving continuity is wall color, says New York designer Glenn Lawson says. Whether “warm” or “cool,” you can use the same one throughout or paint such architectural elements as pilasters, soffits and chair rails variations of the main color, from light to dark, Lawson says. Large furnishings such as sofas and area rugs are most successful when they are, color-wise, “cousins” of the walls, three shades of blue, for example, Lawson adds. “This way the eye keeps travelling throughout the space and is not interrupted by large disparate areas,” Lawson says. Also, consider using pops of the same color, such as a grey sofa in the living room and then a grey chair-seat fabric at the dining table and a grey lamp shade in the library, suggests Shea Soucie of Soucie Horner in Chicago. “Thread a single color – or varying shades of a color – throughout an open space, and you’ll have a comforting sense of continuity as you move from one end of your home to the other,” she says. Flooring “When you have an open-concept living space, it’s important to keep the flooring material consistent so you don’t chop up the flow of the space,” Soucie says. “You can make it interesting by laying wood planks on the diagonal, for instance, or by setting reclaimed European tiles in a herringbone pattern. Whatever you choose, make it the same throughout the space.” Rugs can then be layered on top to soften the look and add warmth. It can also help in identifying the rooms within too. “Rugs are amazingly versatile,” Soucie says. “No matter what kind you choose, they add personality, color, texture and style. And you don’t have to restrict them to your floor by the way – you can hang a beautiful rug on the wall just like you would a piece of art!”   Art and accessories Use art or pillows to enhance the space, such as by repeating or contrasting with an existing color in the room. Add texture with the frame. Don’t just hang the artwork to the wall, though,...

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Why Home Staging Works


Posted By on May 27, 2016

Reposted from sixelements.com. The pictures and their captions were changed as was the client review. Thursday, May 12, 2016 When it comes to buying real estate, house hunters imagine they can look past ugly decor or empty rooms and see “potential”, but they rarely can! That’s why successful builders use Model Homes and Model Suites to sell their projects. They make it easy for a potential buyer to imagine how they will live in the property, they suggest the lifestyle that the buyer will aspire to. Why home staging or house fluffing will help get you top dollar when you sell your home Savvy home sellers realize that the same principals that work when showing a model home apply in the resale market and turn to Professional Home Stagers or House Fluffers to ensure they sell quickly and for top dollar. One look at this dining room staged by Nicole Rorem of Su Casa Staging and you know you’re in a well-maintained modern home. Real estate buyers start house hunting with a logical list of criteria, but the home they actually buy is chosen largely for emotional reasons (unless of course they are buying an investment property that they have no intention of living in). The principal aim in a house fluffing or home staging project is to allow potential buyers to walk into the house and have that “this is it, this is home” feeling. Once a potential buyer can say, “I love it,” they are willing to look past some of the criteria they had on their “must have in my next house list” before they walked in the door. That’s why it is critical to pay attention to even the smallest detail when staging a home to sell. Little things like over crowded rooms, personal memorabilia, dripping taps or doors that stick, all help the buyer emotionally disengage from the house. The annoyances or problems they will have to deal with later build up in their minds, and their thoughts turn to the next listing appointment they have with their agent as they mentally tick your house off their list of possibilities. To sell your home fast, for top dollar, you want buyers to lose their hearts. Falling in love with your home is what motivates someone to actually make an offer instead of just continuing their search for the perfect property. You want them to worry that if they don’t make a decision on your house, someone else will. Then the competition doesn’t stand a chance! What will your “listing” look like online? Another often overlooked aspect of why home staging works is that most potential...

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April 2010 A staged home makes a great impression on buyers. But if you’re not up to the task, how do you find the right person for the job? Property Merchandiser Anthea Click of Nashville, Tenn., says the answers you get to these questions will tell you a lot. 1. Can I see your portfolio? It’s not enough to ask a few questions over the phone. Meet stagers in person and review their portfolio—it’s a sneak peek of their capabilites. Are their example pictures attractive? Are they presented neatly? Does the home you want to stage mesh with the style of the staging pro? 2. What is your training and background? The home staging industry is largely unregulated, so it’s important to find out if stagers have been trained and what their certifications mean. Is their background in in real estate? Have they staged homes in your seller’s price range? Do they know the conditions of the market and what it will take to get the house sold? 3. Do you have a specialty? Many stagers specialize in a specific type of home, such as lofts, condos, starter homes, or luxury homes. Do your homework to make sure the stager’s specialty is what you’re looking for; high-end décor might not look right in a lower-priced listing. Think proportionally, as well. If stagers usually work in large, more spacious homes, their furnishings may be too big for a smaller, urban condo. 4. How do you communicate with home owners? Make sure the stagers you hire have a sense of tact; they should be able to speak with your clients professionally and compassionately. When it comes to a person’s home, the discussion can get sensitive fast. Request that your stager go over the presentation and talking points with you before meeting the sellers. “Your stagers are representative of your business,” Click says. “If they don’t communicate well with your clients, it doesn’t look good.” 5. Do you have other marketing ideas to bring to the table? Some stagers see their role as going beyond simply prepping a home for sale; they often have other strategies for piquing interest in the property. “If buyers aren’t walking through the door, the staging means nothing,” Click says. Ask if there are alternative ways you can work together. For example, rather than a traditional open house, Click has cohosted cooking events with...

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